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Full text of "Alexander von Humboldt"

WILLIAM  TON HITMBOLDT.                 341
it ten years longer, so that he might correct and im-
prove the most minute faults. Humbolclt's linguistic
studies now received a renewed impulse from the trea-
sures Alexander had brought with him. The latter
had during his journey collected, with infinite trouble,
from cloisters and missionary establishments, a con-
siderable number of books of hitherto unknown Ame-
rican dialects. He indeed lent this collection for a
few years to the completer of " Mithridates/' Pro-
fessor Vater? of Konigsberg, and submitted a few to
Franz Schlegel, but he definitely gave them all to his
brother, who was now able to include the new world
in his studies,, and to investigate these languages
thoroughly. William even increased this collection of
American grammars and dictionaries by new treasures
found in Rome5 and among other things obtained pos-
session of fourteen manuscripts which had been copied
from manuscripts of the Abb£ Hervas and the Roman
Propaganda.
Humboldt's merits were now acknowledged on all
sides. F, A, Wolf publicly named him as the one
who had assisted him in a profounder study of archaeo-
logy. The Royal Society of Sciences in GottingeB? in
18033 elected him and his brother as foreign members
of their historical philological section, and in 1808, he
was elected by the Royal Academy of Berlin as cor-
responding member.
The state also acknowledged his services. After
having been named resident ambassador in Rome by
a cabinet order of the loth May, 1S023 he was raised^
in 1805, to the dignity of minister-resident, and in
1806 to that of minister plenipotentiary in Rome,
Hurnboldt had so accustomed himself to this city
during a residence there of six years, that he thought
never to return to reside in his native country. And
he would have willingly remained there longer had
not the terrible catastrophe overwhelmed Prussia
which he had probably long anticipated, and ^in
consequence of which he was required for more active
service.